Sacred mathematics is probably like fine wine

The Enneagram symbol.  It's made up of three parts- the circle, the triangle, and the hexad.  You can see on the hexad, the numbers (if you start at 1) go from 1, 4, 2, 8, 5, 7.  Image from theenneagraminbusiness.com

The Enneagram symbol.  It's made up of three parts- the circle, the triangle, and the hexad.  You can see on the hexad, the numbers (if you start at 1) go from 1, 4, 2, 8, 5, 7.  Image from theenneagraminbusiness.com

As I'm neither a wine afficionado or a mathematician, I can't verify the above claim for absolute certain, but I'm assuming sacred mathematics ranks quite highly on the list of most fascinating phenomena ever.  Plato called number symbolism “the highest level of knowledge”.

At my first workshop on the Enneagram four years ago, our teacher had someone get out their calculator and do this math around the number 9 (and of course, the Enneagram is built around the number 9).  I haven't heard anyone talk about it since, so I was happy to find it in P.D. Ouspensky's book, In Search of the Miraculous.  (He was one of the teachers who recorded Gurdjieff's teachings.) 

So the premise here in the following sequence is that the number 7 was a sacred number as far back as with the Sumerians and the Egyptians.

1/7=.142857...

2/7=.285714...

3/7=.428571...

4/7=.571428...

5/7=.714285...

6/7=..857142...

7/7=.999999...

You can see the 1-4-2-8-5-7 repeating over and over again in the same sequence in these divisions, just starting with a different number, and when you do a little thing the ancient Greeks used to call "theosophical addition" (adding up the sum of the resulting number), you get 9 each time.  I have to read about this tomorrow and will blog about it, but it was just so good to be reconnected with something I'd heard before, and didn't know how to find again.